Share the Science LIVE at BMT Tandem:  Dr. Miguel-Angel Perales,  Immune System Reconstitution Post-Transplant

Share the Science LIVE at BMT Tandem: Dr. Miguel-Angel Perales, Immune System Reconstitution Post-Transplant

Immune system reconstitution post-transplant is a major challenge for cancer patients. Dr. Miguel-Angel Perales is an expert in this field.  At BMT Tandem 2017, Dr. Perales spoke live as part of our on-going #SHARETHESCIENCE series.

Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. welcomed Dr. Miguel-Angel Perales as our featured speaker this year at BMT Tandem in Miami, Florida. Dr. Perales presented “Immune Reconstitution after Stem Cell Transplant: Challenges and Opportunities.”  This event was free and open to the public.

NOW AVAILABLE:  RECORDING FROM THIS LIVE EVENT. CLICK HERE.

We encourage health professionals and current medical students in the area to attend. If you have a family member about to undergo a stem cell transplant, you may also find this presentation of particular interest. Join us by reserving your place now (free).

Immune reconstitution following a stem cell transplant is crucial for patients. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) is an established treatment for hematologic malignancies. However, it is associated with significant adverse events, including infection, relapse, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). An important variable that may affect these outcomes is the recovery of the immune system after transplant.  Surprisingly, there are no FDA approved methods or strategies for immune reconstitution. Several preclinical and clinical studies have identified promising therapeutic strategies for immune regeneration.

In this live presentation, Dr. Perales will review immune reconstitution following HCT, with a particular emphasis on factors that contribute to delayed immune recovery post transplant, including graft source, and the clinical consequences. He will also discuss current clinical and research assays to monitor post-HCT immune recovery and highlight some of the potential strategies that are currently under investigation to enhance immune recovery in HCT recipients.

Dr. Miguel-Angel Perales
from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

presents
“Immune Reconstitution after Stem Cell Transplantation:
Challenges and Opportunities”

LIVE at BMT TANDEM 2017
Gaylord Palms Convention Center, Room: Miami 1
Thursday, February 23rd, 2017
7:00-8:30 am Eastern Time
Free to register. Open to the public.

VIEW the recording of this LIVE event at BMT Tandem 2017

As a leading researcher, Dr. Miguel-Angel Perales  is the deputy chief of the Adult Bone Marrow Transplantation Service and director of the Adult Bone Marrow Transplant Fellowship Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He has more than 130 publications, including peer-reviewed articles, position papers, guidelines, book chapters, editorials, and invited reviews.

In addition to his many accolades, Dr. Perales a member of the board of directors of Be The Match (National Marrow Donor Program – NMDP) and serves on committees for several organizations, including the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT), the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN), the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), and the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology.

  *  *  *

We wish to thank Dr. Perales for volunteering his time to speak on
Share the Science and sharing his valuable insight stem cell transplants.

We also wish to thank our generous sponsors, Mediware Inc., who continue
to support cord blood education through our “Share the Science” series.

Discover the full Share the Science series and view archived webinars highlighting the latest cord blood research.

powerhouses of science - cord blood research

Share the Science: Dr. Colleen Delaney: Applications for Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells

Share the Science: Dr. Colleen Delaney: Applications for Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells

As part of our on-going #SHARETHESCIENCE series, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. are proud to welcome Dr. Colleen Delaney who will speak about the possible clinical applications of expanded cord blood progenitor cells.

As the scientific founder and chief medical officer of Nohla Therapeutics, Inc., Dr. Delaney’s research interests focus on the role of the Notch signaling pathway in hematopoietic stem cell regulation and ex-vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood stem and progenitor cells for clinical applications.

The success of her research led to the establishment of Nohla which is a cellular therapy company focused on developing off-the-shelf, universal donor therapies that require no HLA matching. Her group has developed a novel and clinically feasible method for the ex vivo expansion of cord blood derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in the presence of Notch ligands. This work was translated into a novel pilot study investigating the use of ex vivo expanded cord blood progenitors to augment conventional cord blood transplantation.

She has since extended this work to investigate the potential of cryopreserved, non-HLA matched “off-the-shelf” ex vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells to provide rapid but transient myeloid reconstitution in the setting of cord blood transplant and following dose-intensive chemotherapy.

For this Share the Science webinar, Dr. Delaney discusses methods for expanding cord blood stem and progenitor cells, and the clinical application of these cells for cord blood transplant and chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

Dr. Colleen Delaney from NoHLA Therapeutics
presents
“Clinical Applications for Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells”
RECORDED:  Wednesday, December 14th: Noon – 1 p.m. central time
Webinar:  Free to register. Open to the public.

VIEW this recorded SHARE THE SCIENCE webinar featuring Dr. Colleen Delaney: Clinical Applications of Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells

Cord blood is an effective and widely used source of stem cells for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant for hematologic malignancies. While cord blood offers some distinct advantages over conventional stem cell sources, delayed engraftment due to the low cell dose available in each unit continues to be a challenge in the transplant setting. This webinar will cover development and clinical translation of methodologies for the ex vivo expansion of cord blood stem and progenitor cells.

Dr. Delaney will also discuss the clinical use of expanded cord blood progenitors, which has been shown to be safe in the settings of hematopoietic transplant and dose-intensive chemotherapy. In the cord blood transplant setting, use of these expanded cells has been shown to reduce time to neutrophil and platelet recovery as well as being associated with less severe acute GVHD. In the setting of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, expanded cells have been shown to decrease the rate of documented infection.

  *  *  *

We wish to thank Dr. Delaney for volunteering her time to speak on Share the Science and sharing her valuable insight on cord blood.

We also wish to thank our generous sponsors, Mediware Inc., who continue to support cord blood education through our “Share the Science” series.

Discover the full Share the Science series and view archived webinars highlighting the latest cord blood research.

powerhouses of science - cord blood research

Share the Science: Improve Operating Costs & Maximize Potential of Cord Blood – Linda Peltier, PhD

Share the Science: Improve Operating Costs & Maximize Potential of Cord Blood – Linda Peltier, PhD

Cord blood banking is expensive.  Preserving cord blood is a process that depends on highly skilled personnel and very sophisticated equipment. Operating costs are high. Upfront investments for both public and private are significant.

In recent years, the increase in regulations have created new challenges for those running public and private banks. Public banks are counting every penny while trying to offer the option to donate cord blood to as many parents as possible. Some private banks have pursued hybrid models in order to serve parents who want to donate as well as those who wish to privately bank. The hybrid model presents both challenges and opportunities when considering operating costs. Meanwhile, private banks continue to fight rising fierce competition which, in turn, forces them to keep prices as low as possible.

The main question on everyone’s mind is “How can we do this better?”

  • Can we lower operating costs?
  • How can we recover costs and still help the greater good?
  • Can we do something useful with cord blood donations that do not meet the new criteria imposed by public registries?
  • Can we take advantage of new operating methods and new transplant methods?

Share the Science welcomes Linda Peltier, Ph.D. from McGill University who will share her expertise on improving operating costs for cord blood banks and how to maximize the potential of cord blood collections.  With over 35 years of experience in the different healthcare fields, Peltier has become an authority in clinical and laboratory quality assurance. For the past 12 years, she has specialized in cord blood banking and stem cell processing. (Learn more about the cord blood bank at McGill University Health Centre here.)

Share the Science with Linda Peltier, PhD
“How to Potentialize Donations to Cord Blood Banks”
RECORDED:  Friday, December 2nd, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m, Central Time
Free webinar. Open to the public.

VIEW this recorded webinar now featuring Linda Peltier discussing: How to Potentialize Donations at Cord Blood Banks

In this free webinar, Peltier will discuss how public cord blood banks were initially established to store optimal units for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Compliance with new regulations and transplant physician requests for an increased number of cells per cord blood unit (CBU) increased the processing costs to a point that some public CBBs had to merge or shut down. The current operational model must be modified. Product diversification and better use of each CBU is one approach that could improve the CBB cost recovery model.

Peltier will discuss ways to recover cord blood and tissue components for a better operational cost. Her analysis is based on 1607 CBUs collected by the McGill University Health Centre Clinical Research Cord Blood Bank (MUHC CRCBB). McGill’s bank was able to recover more than 85% of units rejected by the public bank and calculated that making available cord blood plasma for MSC culture could double the revenue of the bank.

This webinar promises to be beneficial to the management teams of both public and private banks. There is opportunity here, especially for those banks who adhere to the highest standards. Techniques taught in this webinar could help put your cord blood bank ahead of the competition while helping the industry as a whole.

 *  *  *

We wish to express our sincere thanks to Linda Peltier for sharing her expertise and insight
on improving operational costs for cord blood banks.

Mediware_Corporate (1)We also wish to thank our generous sponsors, Mediware Inc., who continue to support cord blood education through our “Share the Science” series.

 

 

Share the Science:  Cord Blood to Help People with Spinal Cord Injury, Dr. Wise Young at AABB

Share the Science: Cord Blood to Help People with Spinal Cord Injury, Dr. Wise Young at AABB

Every year it is estimated that there are 12,000 spinal cord injuries in the US alone (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/sci/detail_sci.htm). These are life changing injuries for which there is currently no cure. Long term care of patients suffering from spinal cord injury is not only extremely expensive, it is emotionally and physically challenging in ways few could ever understand.  Cord blood could provide hope to those who so desperately need it.

Special LIVE EVENT during 2016 AABB Conference in Orlando, Florida
SHARE THE SCIENCE

featuring

Wise Young, MD, Phd
“Cord Blood Therapies as Potential Treatments for People with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury
Orange County Convention Center, room W224GH Orlando, FL
Monday, October 24, 2016
7:00 – 8:15 a.m. eastern time

NOTE:  This was a special LIVE event held during the
2016 AABB Conference in Orlando, Florida. This presentation was not recorded.

View the archive of Share the Science webinars.

Dr. Wise Young, M.D., Ph.D., Distinguished Professor, founding director of the W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience and a distinguished professor, is recognized as one of the world’s outstanding neuroscientists.

His accolades are many yet what makes him a leading researcher in the cord blood industry is his commitment to bringing treatments to people with spinal cord Injuries. He built and trained a 25 center clinical trial network in China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, where human clinical trials using umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and lithium are underway. In the initial results from the phase II trial in Kunming, China, 75% of the participants (15 out of 20) recovered walking with a rolling walker. He is establishing clinical trial networks in the United States, Norway, and India. Phase IIB trials started in 2015, and phase III trials are getting underway this year.

We are truly honored to have Dr. Young join us for this special edition of “Share the Science” during the 2016 AABB Conference.

Attendees of this live “Share the Science” presentation will hear Dr. Young give details on his groundbreaking research “Cord Blood Therapies as Potential Treatments for People with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.”  Dr. Young will begin with a discussion about the rationale for his work. . .

“In the past decade, hundreds of laboratories have reported that UCB cells, particularly UCB mononuclear cells (UCBMNC), have beneficial effects on a variety of conditions, including cerebral palsy, stroke, and spinal cord injury. Several groups have done clinical trials transplanting UCBMNC into the brain and spinal cords of patients, suggesting that the therapies are safe and possibly beneficial. We sought to test the safety and efficacy of UCBMNC transplanted into people with chronic complete spinal cord injury. In addition, because animal studies suggest that lithium stimulates UCBMNC to grow and to produce growth factors that stimulate regeneration, we wanted to assess the effects of a 6-week course of oral lithium carbonate given to patients after transplant of UCBMNC.”

Dr. Young will also discuss in detail:

  • Why exercise is necessary but not sufficient for recovery
  • How people can recover even after chronic complete spinal cord injury
  • Skepticism of claims that intrathecal administration of UCBMNC will be effective for chronic spinal cord injury, particularly without intensive rehabilitation

Attendees of this presentation will learn about various clinical applications using UCBMNC to treat spinal cord injury, results of these trials by Dr. Young and how people can recover from chronic spinal injury.

 *  *  *

We wish to thank Dr. Young for participating in “Share the Science” and sharing his valuable insight on using cord blood to potentially treat spinal cord injuries.

Mediware_Corporate (1)We also wish to thank our generous sponsors, Mediware Inc., who continue to support cord blood education through our “Share the Science” series.

 

Can We Prevent or Cure Diabetes with Cord Blood? The CoRD Study

Can We Prevent or Cure Diabetes with Cord Blood? The CoRD Study

Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood, affecting around 1 in 500 children.  The world is desperate for a cure and many scientists feel that cord blood could be the key to potentially eradicating this horrible disease. The CoRD Study in Australia, led by Dr. Maria Craig, hopes to provide answers.

UPDATED: To view the webinar recorded August 17th, 2016, please follow the link below.

Dr. Maria Craig, professor of paediatric endocrinology, the University of Sydney and Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, recently joined us on Share the Science to discuss the CoRD study (Cord blood Reinfusion in Diabetes). This pioneering study represents a world-first in using cord blood to potentially treat or even cure Type 1 diabetes.

Visit the official website for this clinical trial using cord blood to treat diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes results from the destruction of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas by the body’s immune system. It appears that there is an imbalance between certain types of immune cells and ‘good’ immune cells called regulatory T cells, which are important in controlling the immune system.

During this webinar, Dr. Craig helps us in understanding more about the immune system in children at risk of developing type 1 diabetes as well as the potential for preventing this disease.

Share the Science with Dr. Maria Craig
“Can we prevent or cure Type 1 Diabetes with cord blood?”
Wednesday, August 17th, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Central Time
Free webinar. Open to the public. 

View the RECORDED WEBINAR with Dr. Maria Craig who discusses the CoRD Study on diabetes.

Cord blood contains a diverse mixture of cells. It is a particularly rich source of stem cells that have the ability to develop into many different blood cell types, creating the blood and immune system. Cord blood is also a source of other types of stem cells as well regulatory T-cells, which may have potential for treating immune disorders. Due to their flexibility and diversity, the cells found in cord blood may be effective in the treatment of many other diseases, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy.

In Australia, Dr. Craig and her team are undertaking a world-first study, the CoRD study, to assess whether the unique cells found in cord blood can actually stop the immune destruction in the pancreas and protect a child from developing the disease. The study is aimed at high-risk children (those who have a close relative with type 1 diabetes) who have their cord blood stored in a cord blood bank.

The pilot study involves two phases:

  • Screening – in which a child is tested for diabetes autoantibodies (early markers of diabetes)
  • Treatment and follow-up – where eligible children who are at very high risk of developing diabetes receive an infusion of their own cord blood and then are followed up.

Dr. Craig and her team believe the study will help us to understand more about the immune system in children at risk of developing diabetes and may actually help find ways to prevent this lifelong disease.  The CoRD study is being funded by a grant from Australia’s largest private cord blood bank, Cell Care Australia.


A special thank you to our friends at
Mediware Information Systems

who have helped make this webinar possible through their generous support.


Are you enjoying our Share the Science series? 

Give a $10 Donation!

Thank you for joining us each time for a new and exciting discussion with a leading cord blood expert.

We never charge a fee for our programs and we want to keep it that way.

At Save the Cord Foundation, we are serious about cord blood education. Help us to keep programs like Share the Science going strong and keep the cord blood industry growing strong, together.

Make a tax-deductible donation today!

Thank you.

 


CLICK HERE TO VIEW OTHER WEBINARS FROM THE SHARE THE SCIENCE ARCHIVE

Women’s Health: Perinatal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine, presented by Dr. Cetrulo Sr.

Women’s Health: Perinatal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine, presented by Dr. Cetrulo Sr.

Recently on Share the Science. . . a special focus on Women’s Health and the revolutionary impact of perinatal stem cells in medicine!  Could we soon be treating victims of a stroke or heart attack with a “cord blood cocktail” in the emergency room? Don’t miss this discussion with Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr. and learn the latest.

Recently, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware were honored to host Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr. for a special edition of #SHARETHESCIENCE focused on Maternal Health (click the link below to watch the full recorded webinar).  Dr. Cetrulo Sr. is a board-certified in OB/GYN and maternal medicine, and former professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is also one of the leading pioneers of the cord blood movement as one of the two founding members of the International Cord Blood Society (ICBS), a non-profit organization founded in 1995 to promote cord blood research, and the nonprofit International Perinatal Stem Cell Society, Inc., formed in 2013.

For this edition of Share the Science, Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. discusses the importance of perinatal stem cells and the impact they will have on treating a variety of diseases. He discusses this revolution in Women’s Health / Maternal Health highlighting recent discoveries in the field and explaining the potential impact these discoveries will have on medicine in general.

In particular, Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. will discuss how he anticipates that in the near future people who go to emergency rooms with chest pain, with the presumptive diagnosis of a heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), will be given an off-the-shelf stem cell preparation to prevent heart muscle damage.

Here a quick preview of what to expect in this webinar:

FDA Policies Cord Blood Cellular Therapies

Watch the webinar now and learn:

  • The sources of perinatal stem cells
  • How early in pregnancy these cells are present
  • The potential of perinatal stem cells for the treatment of many diseases
  • The importance of saving the placenta, cord blood and cord tissue cells

Curtis L. Cetrulo Sr., M.D., discusses the importance of perinatal stem cells and the impact they will have on treating a variety of diseases.

Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr. presents
Women’s Health: “Perinatal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine”

RECORDED:  Wednesday, May 11th, 2016  11 a.m. – Noon U.S. Central Time

REGISTER NOW: Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr – “Perinatal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine”

Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. is widely recognized for his expertise in this field and never fails to impress when explaining the science behind some of the most advanced stem cell research happening today. His interest in perinatal stem cells has also had great impact on his career.

From 1984 until 2008, Dr. Cetrulo was a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is one of the two founding members of the International Cord Blood Society (ICBS), a non-profit organization founded in 1995 to promote cord blood research, and the nonprofit International Perinatal Stem Cell Society, Inc., formed in 2013.

Dr. Cetrulo is currently a board member and medical consultant for Auxocell Laboratories, Inc. He completed his obstetrics/gynecology residency program at the University of Colorado in Denver in 1973. After doing his undergraduate work at Columbia University (1965), Dr. Cetrulo graduated from the New Jersey College of Medicine in 1969.

A visionary in the field of women’s health, Dr. Cetrulo’s passion for the topic of perinatal stem cells is contagious. You will not want to miss this webinar.

 

Cord blood partners save the cord and mediwareWe wish to thank Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. for his time and Mediware for their continued support in bringing you the Share the Science series to you. 

 


Are you familiar with the REGROW act that Dr. Cetrulo Sr. refers to in his webinar? 

After you listen to Share the Science with Dr. Cetrulo Sr., please take a moment to show your support for the REGROW Act. The bipartisan Regrow Act has been introduced in the Senate to create a new regulatory pathway to bring safe and effective treatments to patients in the United States. While this petition is really US based, it has worldwide implications as other countries and their governments will be watching to see how the US welcomes this new era in medicine. Read more and sign the petition here. . . REGROW Act 

 


Are you enjoying our Share the Science series? 

Give a $10 Donation!

Thank you for joining us each time for a new and exciting discussion with a leading cord blood expert. We never charge a fee for our programs and we want to keep it that way.

At Save the Cord Foundation, we are serious about cord blood education. Help us to keep programs like Share the Science going strong and keep the cord blood industry growing strong, together.

Make a financial donation today!

Thank you.

 


CLICK HERE TO VIEW OTHER WEBINARS FROM THE SHARE THE SCIENCE ARCHIVE

Repairing Organs and Treating Neonatal Diseases with Stem Cell Therapy, presented by Dr. Bernard THEBAUD

Repairing Organs and Treating Neonatal Diseases with Stem Cell Therapy, presented by Dr. Bernard THEBAUD

Recently on Share the Science, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware were honored to host Dr. Bernard THEBAUD, neonatologist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and a senior scientist with the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute.  Dr. THEBAUD discussed using stem cell therapy to improve lung disease and repair organ damage in premature infants.

Dr. THEBAUDS’s research focuses on the clinical translation of stem-cell-based therapies for neonatal disease. Perinatal care has improved tremendously over recent generations.  Thus, the survival rate of premature children has likewise increased.  However, with this improvement in survival rates come new challenges.  Dr. THEBAUD sees this first hand in his work.

A premature infant faces numerous challenges in terms of organ development. One of the biggest challenges is protecting premature lungs from injury.

Premature infants are at risk of developing chronic lung disease or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The long-term consequences of early interference with lung development are not completely understood and there are no specific treatments to prevent complications of extreme prematurity.

Dr. THEBAUD and his team are on the cutting edge of stem cell biology and using stem cells to repair damaged organs.  In recent years, investigators have captured the repair capabilities of a variety of stem cells in experimental models of BPD. While it is clear that further pre-clinical studies are needed, this webinar with Dr. THEBAUD will highlight the exciting potential for umbilical cord blood derived stem cell based therapies for the prevention or treatment of BPD and other complications.

Dr. THEBAUD’s sucesses in this area of research are leading to promising results with patients; yet, challenges still remain. He will discuss this and more during our next Share the Science:

Dr. Bernard THEBAUD presents
“Recycling Matters: Cord-Derived Stem Cell Treatment of Neonatal Diseases”

RECORDED:  Thursday, April 28th, 11 a.m. – Noon U.S. Central Time

WATCH THE WEBINAR NOW: Dr. Bernard THEBAUD, Recycling Matters – Cord-Derived Stem Cell Treatment of Neonatal Diseases

Specialist in stem cell therapies for lung diseases, Dr. Thébaud is a senior scientist with the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and a neonatologist with the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, where he provides care to critically ill newborns.  He is also a professor of Pediatrics at the University of Ottawa.

Dr. Thébaud obtained his medical degree at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg, France in 1991 and trained in pediatrics and neonatology at the University Paris V in Paris, France, where he also obtained his M.Sc. and Ph.D. before completing a 2-year post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Alberta.

He received the “Rising Star in Perinatal Research” award from the CIHR Institute for Human Development, Child and Youth Health in 2008, and the “Best in Current Canadian Child Health Research” Sanofi Pasteur Research Award in 2007. Dr. Thébaud currently holds the University of Ottawa Partnership Research Chair in Regenerative Medicine.

 

Cord blood partners save the cord and mediwareWe wish to thank Dr. THEBAUD for his time and Mediware for their continued support in bringing you the Share the Science series to you. 


Are you enjoying our Share the Science series? 

Give a $10 Donation!

Thank you for joining us each time for a new and exciting discussion with a leading cord blood expert. We never charge a fee for our programs and we want to keep it that way.

At Save the Cord Foundation, we are serious about cord blood education. Help us to keep programs like Share the Science going strong and keep the cord blood industry growing strong, together.

Make a financial donation today!

Thank you.

Cellular Therapies for Athletes and Possible FDA Policies: Interview with Dr. Cetrulo, Sr.

Cellular Therapies for Athletes and Possible FDA Policies: Interview with Dr. Cetrulo, Sr.

How will future FDA policies affect research and potential cellular therapies using cord blood and other perinatal stem cells? Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. explains his concerns in this video.

Together with our friends at BioInformant, we recently spoke with Dr. Curtis Cetrulo, Sr. at the 2016 Perinatal Stem Cell Conference in Aspen, Colorado about cellular therapies and potential FDA policies.

This is not the first time that we have interviewed Dr. Cetrulo, Sr.. Each time we are impressed with his vision of how the cord blood and perinatal stem cell industry is developing. A pioneer in this field, he has always been an advocate for cord blood preservation and, as much as is possible, the preservation of all perinatal stem cells.

Curtis Cetrulo speaks on FDA Policies and cellular therapies

Dr. Curtis Cetrulo, Sr. speaking at the 2016 Perinatal Stem Cell Conference

Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. was one of the main speakers at this event where he presented:

“Perinatal Stem Cells and Reconstructive Transplantation: Potential Therapies for Wounded Warriors and Athletes”

The presentation focused on the increasingly interesting research involving the use of various types of perinatal stem cells (including those from cord blood) in the treatment of sports injuries.

We asked Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. to give us a quick overview of his presentation in simple terms so that our community of parents and medical professionals could hear for themselves what makes perinatal stem cells special and why we should save them.  Indeed, he discussed this and more during our quick chat. He also expressed his growing concern that future government policies, such as those coming up for debate with the FDA, might try to limit what we can do with stem cells in such a way that could impede research or rule out certain applications that are potentially very beneficial.

Watch this interview to learn about the potential of perinatal stem cells and hear Dr. Cetrulo’s concerns about potential FDA policies, a concern we share:

 

FDA Policies Cord Blood Cellular Therapies

 

We wish to thank Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. and the Perinatal Stem Cell Society for their help in making this project possible. 

cord tissue - bioinformant and save the cord foundation


 

This quick interview with Dr. Cetrulo Sr. is great introduction
to his more detailed presentation on
SHARE THE SCIENCE:
Women’s Health: Perinatal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

 


Are you looking for a public cord blood donation program or a family bank near you?
Simply explore our map or check out our list of cord blood banks and donation programs around the world.

cord-blood-world-map

Preview Changes to FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin

Preview Changes to FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin

Recently on Share the Science, Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin, Chief Medical Officer at FACT, gave a preview to the upcoming changes for FACT Accreditation Standards.

Preview FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr Phyllis Warkentin

Share the Science: Preview FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr Phyllis I. Warkentin

As the Chief Medical Officer for the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT), Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin is at the forefront of the cord blood industry.  Her unique experience and perspective are valued not only by those who are members of FACT but the stem cell community at large.

Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware recently welcomed Dr. Warkentin as a featured speaker on our Share the Science webinar series.  She took the opportunity to openly discuss the upcoming 6th edition NetCord-FACT Standards which will be published in July 2016.

FACT is a unique organization and one of only two groups that officially accredit cord blood banks worldwide.  Established in 1996, it is a non-profit group focused on standards for high quality medical and laboratory practice in cellular therapies. The voluntary inspection program is at the core of the group’s purpose as it relies heavily on peer review and a collegial approach.

FACT standards are reviewed and updated every three years based on scientific advances, recommendations from cord blood banking experts, and common deficiencies. As a founding member of the FACT Board of Directors, Dr. Warkentin established the standards-setting and accrediting arm of FACT’s parent organizations: The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) and the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT).

During her presentation (view the recorded webinar now), Dr. Warkentin explained in detail why FACT chose to make these changes in accreditation standards and extended recommendations to cord blood banks globally on how to best meet the new standards.

Please join our professional community at Save the Cord Foundation where we keep you in the loop on the latest research, best practices and key events in cord blood industry.

*Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware wish to thank
Dr. Warkentin and FACT for helping to make this webinar possible.


Who’s speaking next?  Keep up with the latest in cord blood banking. Register for the next SHARE THE SCIENCE event here.

Discover some of our other articles that give an in-depth view of the cord blood banking, research and best practices:

Cord Blood Stem Cells for Brain & Spinal Cord Injury: Dr. Cox Discusses His Clinical Trial

Cord Blood Stem Cells for Brain & Spinal Cord Injury: Dr. Cox Discusses His Clinical Trial

Together with our friends at BioInformant, we recently spoke with Dr. Charles Cox, Jr. from the Texas Trauma Institute about his work and on-going clinical trial focused on using cellular therapies (including the use of cord blood stem cells) for traumatic brain injury, and related neurological injuries (hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, stroke, spinal cord injury). His team has recently completed Phase 1 of an important clinical trial in this area of research.

Dr. Cox is the George and Cynthia Mitchell Distinguished Chair in Neurosciences and directs the Pediatric Surgical Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine at the UTHealth Medical School. He also directs the Pediatric Trauma Program at the UT Health Medical School/Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital in the Texas Medical Center.

We caught up with Dr. Cox during the 2016 Perinatal Stem Cell Conference in Aspen, Colorado where he was one of the main speakers at this event and presented:

“Cell based therapies for neurological injuries: Update on clinical trials.”

For parents and doctors alike, the work of Dr. Cox and his team is incredibly important. He has just completed the first acute, autologous cell therapy treatment Phase I study for traumatic brain injury in children. It is a collaborative effort between leading institutions in the Texas Medical Center including The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Memorial Hermann Children’s Hospital, MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital, and The Center for Cell and Gene Therapy (CAGT) at Baylor College of Medicine. Pediatric patients (age 5-14) with a post-resuscitation Glascow Coma Score (GCS) between 5 and 8 are identified and further evaluated. The clinical trial is registered under FDA IND RB 12620.

This study began in 2006 with a focus on using bone marrow to treat traumatic brain injury. The study has evolved to include analysis of the use of cord blood stem cells in treating traumatic brain injury and the role of heterologous cellular therapies. Dr. Cox’s discussed the use of cord blood stem cells as it relates to this study in this short interview (watch the video of this interview):

Cord Blood Stem Cells for Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

Regenerative medicine is an amazing field of medicine which is quickly changing the way we treat not only traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury but hearing loss, stroke, etc. Cord blood stem cells are vital to this area of medicine. However, cord blood stem cells are typically thrown away as medical waste when a baby is born.

Scientists like Dr. Cox hope that more parents will realize the value of cord blood. It could make the difference in someone’s life. Traumatic brain injuries and spinal cord injuries are not something we can foresee. These injuries can happen in the blink of an eye.

Using cord blood stem cells in regenerative medicine to treat these types of injuries is potentially a game changer for patients around the world. Yet, it won’t happen if we continue to throw cord blood away. We must change our habits. We must be pro-active as parents and insist that our baby’s cord blood either be donated or privately banked at birth. This simple gesture does not harm you or your baby but it could change the world of medicine forever.

Give life twice. #SAVETHECORD

We wish to thank Dr. Cox and the Perinatal Stem Cell Society for their help in making this project possible. 

cord tissue - bioinformant and save the cord foundation


 

Are you pregnant?

Want to save your baby’s cord blood? Check out our interactive guide to cord blood banking where we list both private family banks and public donation programs around the world:

cord-blood-world-map

 

About Save the Cord Foundation

Save the Cord Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization, was established to promote awareness of the life-saving benefits of cord blood based on unbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and family cord blood banks worldwide.

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