Share the Science: Using Amniotic Membrane in Ocular Surface Disease with Dr. Roxana URSEA

Share the Science: Using Amniotic Membrane in Ocular Surface Disease with Dr. Roxana URSEA

As our readers know well, our primary focus here at Save the Cord Foundation is to encourage the preservation of cord blood stem cells which can be used to treat 80+ diseases. Yet, we also recognize the growing importance of perinatal stem cells, cord tissues, uses for the placenta, amniotic membrane, etc. Scientists agree we are just on the tip of the iceberg in understanding how to use these “by-products” of the birthing process more wisely. We should not simply throw them away without asking first. . . do they have a potential second use? 

With this thought in mind, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. are proud to announce the next edition in our Share the Science series — a real world example of how the amniotic membrane (a by-product of the birthing process) is currently used in ophthalmology and as well as potential uses for this medical resource in the near future. 

UPDATE: RECORDING NOW AVAILABLE, CLICK LINK BELOW — On October 24th, 2017, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. will welcome Dr. Roxana URSEA from the University of Arizona Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. Dr. Ursea will discuss how the amniotic membrane is currently used and how it can help heal ocular surface disease (OSD).  She will discuss its clinical significance, her own research in this area and data from various clinical applications.

amniotic membrane from placenta for ocular surface disease

Amniotic membrane for the eye – Share the Science with Dr. Roxana Ursea

According to the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami, ocular surface diseases affect the “surface of the cornea—the transparent layer that forms the front of the eye. These diseases include dry eye syndrome, meibomian gland dysfunctionblepharitis, rosaceous, allergies, scarring from glaucoma medications, chemical burns, thermal burns, and immunological conditions such as Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid and Sjogren’s Syndrome.
Ocular surface diseases can severely affect eyesight and quality of life. Symptoms may include blurry vision, discomfort or pain, redness and itching, and in severe cases, blindness due to corneal scarring.” (source: Bascom Palmer Eye Institute – OSD overview ).

Use of amniotic membrane for the eye has been common practice for several years and indications for its use have continued to expand. The reasons for its use are numerous. Notably, amniotic membrane, the innermost layer of the placenta, can stabilize the ocular surface. It exhibits strong anti-inflammatory properties, promotes healing without scarring, and supports stem cell expansion. In patients with moderate to severe dry eye, cryo-preserved amniotic membrane plays a role in corneal nerve regeneration and restores corneal nerve integrity.

During this webinar, Dr. Ursea will discuss the important role the amniotic membrane plays in healing a variety of ocular surface diseases. She will share data for how to best utilize these clinical applications. She will discuss in detail how the amniotic membrane can be used as a biological bandage for superficial epithelial defects or as a permanent graft for deeper defects, including stromal defects, post-infectious ulcers, recurrent erosions/endothelial basement membrane dystrophy, small corneal perforations, inflammatory conditions, and chemical burns. She will also cover how it is especially beneficial in ocular surface reconstruction cases as well as in selected post-surgical procedures.

Please join us for this exciting free webinar. . .

Share the Science
featuring
Dr. Roxana Ursea
“Clinical Applications of Amniotic Membrane in Ocular Surface Disease”
Tuesday, October 24th | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Central Time

Free online webinar – Open to the Public
RECORDING NOW AVAILABLE – REGISTER ONLINE HERE

Attendees will learn about the:

  • Role of amniotic membrane in promoting regenerative healing
  • Clinical significance of amniotic membrane and the rationale for its use
  • Science behind amniotic membrane use and its ocular indications and outcomes, including data from clinical cases
  • Pearls and pitfalls in using the amniotic membrane products in your practice
REGISTER HERE for SHARE THE SCIENCE (Recording of Live Webinar Now Available – Free, Open to all): Dr. Roxana URSEA discusses “Clinical Applications of Amniotic Membrane in Ocular Surface Disease”

About Dr. Roxana Ursea:

Dr. Ursea is a clinical associate professor of ophthalmology at the University of Arizona Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences.  After completing her residency in ophthalmology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell and University of Maryland in Baltimore, Dr. Ursea expanded her clinical expertise with specialized training in uveitis and ocular immunology at the National Eye Institute of NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. She completed a second fellowship in cornea, external diseases, and refractive surgery at the University of California in San Diego.

Dr. Ursea is active in many professional organizations and has published in major peer-reviewed journals. She is a recognized national and international expert in ocular imaging, in particular, high-frequency ultrasound, and has received numerous awards, including the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Achievement Award and the University of Arizona’s prestigious Vernon and Virginia Furrow Award for Excellence in Teaching Clinical Sciences.

Her clinical interests include keratoconus, laser vision correction, and challenging uveitis cases while her research interests include exploring new applications of high frequency ultrasound and new therapeutic modalities for anterior segment disorders. She has an active clinical and surgical practice at Northwest Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona.

Save the Cord Foundation wishes to thank Dr. Ursea
for sharing her valuable insight and expertise
with our Share the Science community.
We also wish to thank Mediware, Inc.
for their continued generous support of this program. 

 

Share the Science continues to be a popular series within the cord blood community and beyond. We welcome your input on the series and suggestions for future speakers. Give your feedback here.

powerhouses of science - cord blood research
Previous Share the Science presentations have been archived for your reference. Discover the work of leading scientists and cord blood industry experts through this educational series. View the archive now.

Share the Science is made possible thanks to the generous support of Mediware, Inc.

 

Share the Science LIVE with Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg: Cord Blood for Autism, Cerebral Palsy and more

Share the Science LIVE with Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg: Cord Blood for Autism, Cerebral Palsy and more

EXCLUSIVE LIVE EVENT:
Join us for a special edition of Share the Science featuring Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg at this year’s AABB Annual Meeting in San Diego, California.

Update: This presentation was made live on October 9th, 2017 during the AABB 2017 Annual Meetings. For more information, please contact Save the Cord Foundation.

Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg is recognized around the world for her outstanding work in cord blood research. In recent years, her research has been focused on using cord blood to potentially treat autism in young children. As the results from her clinical trials have started to come in, the medical world and parents have taken notice.  She was recently interviewed by CNN along with her colleague, Dr. Geraldine Dawson, Director of Duke’s Center for Autism and Brain Development, about the encouraging results from these clinical trials.  With more than two-thirds of children showing improvement, Dr. Kurtzberg and her team are now moving into phase two hoping to find a long-term treatment option for children with autism.

According to Dr. Kurtzberg, cord blood cells can work through paracrine and trophic mechanisms to help endogenous cells heal brain tissue damaged by disease or injury. Learning from observations made using unrelated donor umbilical cord blood transplant after myeloablative chemotherapy to treat children with certain inherited metabolic diseases, cord blood therapies have been developed to treat children with acquired brain injuries, like hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, cerebral palsy, and autism.

As the research moves forward and new clinical trials begin, Dr. Kurtzberg has agreed to speak with our Share the Science community about the safety and feasibility of using autologous cord blood infusion in young children with autism spectrum disorder. She will also expand her talk into other areas of possible clinical application for cord blood therapies.  Join us for this exclusive live event at the AABB Annual Meetings in San Diego, California.

Share the Science LIVE at AABB
Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg
“Novel applications of cord blood derived therapies
for genetic and acquired brain diseases.”

San Diego Convention Center: Room 29B
San Diego, CA | MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2017| 7 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. PACIFIC TIME
Free to register. Open to all.

REGISTER HERE for SHARE THE SCIENCE (Live at AABB 2017): Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg, “Novel applications of cord blood derived therapies for genetic and acquired brain diseases” *NOTE: Attendance is limited and access to the event will be granted to the first 100 people to register.

 

Data from early phase human clinical trials for safety and efficacy in these diseases will be presented by Dr. Kurtzberg. Results of preclinical and IND-enabling studies will be presented to provide information about safety and potential mechanisms of action of cord blood cells in this setting.

In addition, attendees will learn about:

  • The history and evolution of cord blood banking and transplant
  • About quality measures of cord blood units
  • About new clinical applications for cord blood therapies

About the speaker

Joanne Kurtzberg, MD is the Director, Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, Chief Scientific and Medical Officer, Robertson Clinical and Translational Cell Therapy Program, Director, Carolinas Cord Blood Bank and Co-Director, Stem Cell Laboratory.

She is an internationally renowned expert in pediatric hematology/oncology, pediatric blood and marrow transplant, umbilical cord blood banking and transplant, and novel applications of cord blood in the emerging fields of cellular therapies and regenerative medicine.

Over the last two decades, Dr. Kurtzberg has established an internationally known pediatric transplant program; one of the largest unrelated donor cord blood banks, the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, in the world; and the Julian Robertson Cell and Translational Therapy Program (CT2) at Duke.

Dr. Kurtzberg has published more than 300 peer-reviewed papers, multiple chapters, and scientific reviews. She is a member of the American Society of Hematology, the American Association of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, the International Society of Cellular Therapies, the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC), and other organizations. She serves on the Board of the Foundation of Accreditation of Cellular Therapies, Advisory Council of Blood Stem Cell Transplantation to Health and Human Services. Dr. Kurtzberg was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from the PBMTC in 2012.

 

We wish to thank Dr. Kurtzberg for sharing her
valuable insight on cord blood research for autism
with our Share the Science community.
We also wish to thank Mediware, Inc.
for their generous support making this webinar possible. 

Share the Science continues to be a popular series within the cord blood community and beyond. We welcome your input on the series and suggestions for future speakers. Give your feedback here.

powerhouses of science - cord blood research
Previous Share the Science presentations have been archived for your reference. Discover the work of leading scientists and cord blood industry experts through this educational series. View the archive now.

Share the Science is made possible thanks to the generous support of Mediware, Inc.

 

Share the Science: Dr. Kevin Burns, Treating Acute Kidney Injury

Share the Science: Dr. Kevin Burns, Treating Acute Kidney Injury

 

RECORDING COMING SOON:  Acute kidney injury (AKI) is incredibly common, affecting as many as 20% of hospitalized patients according to the National Kidney Foundation.  Sadly, despite years of research, doctors have not found an effective treatment for acute kidney injury. As a result, mortality rates remain high at 1-5% of hospitalized patients. However, the research of Dr. Kevin D. Burns from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute is providing new hope for patients and cord blood may be the key.

Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. are proud to welcome Dr. Kevin Burns to speak about his research on the next edition of our popular webinar series, Share the Science (learn more about the series here). A professor of medicine in the division of Nephrology at the Department of Medicine of the Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Dr. Burns has dedicated his career to kidney research.

Using cord blood for acute kidney injury

Image courtesy of yodiyim at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Dr. Burns will present research findings from his laboratory on the reparation properties of extracellular vesicles (exosomes) isolated from human cord blood-derived endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) in experimental Acute Kidney Injury. When infused into mice with ischemia/reperfusion Acute Kidney Injury, ECFC exosomes protect against loss of kidney function, prevent inflammatory cell infiltration into the kidneys, and inhibit apoptotic responses. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs, his lab found that ECFC exosomes are highly enriched in microRNA-486-5p, which targets the pro-apoptotic factor PTEN. Data from his lab supports the notion that infused exosomes transfer microRNA-486-5p to injured kidney endothelial cells after ischemia/reperfusion Acute Kidney Injury, leading to inhibition of PTEN and subsequent activation of the pro-survival Akt pathway. Finally, he will present data indicating that infused ECFC exosomes selectively home to the injured kidneys after Acute Kidney Injury. This webinar will present information suggesting that ECFC-derived exosomes hold promise as potential therapeutic agents in humans with Acute Kidney Injury.

Join us for this presentation. . .

Share the Science with Dr. Kevin D. Burns
“Cord Blood Endothelial Colony Forming Cell-Derived Exosomes in Acute Kidney Injury”
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 3-4pm Central Time
Free to register. Open to the public.

REGISTER HERE for SHARE THE SCIENCE: Dr. Kevin Burns, “Cord Blood Endothelial Colony Forming Cell-Derived Exosomes in Acute Kidney Injury”

 

Recommended reading: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26073035

During the webinar, attendees will learn about:

  • Clinical significance of acute kidney injury and the rationale for the use of cellular therapy
  • Effects of administration of ECFCs in experimental ischemia/reperfusion Acute Kidney Injury
  • Potential role of ECFC-derived exosomes in mediating therapeutic responses in Acute Kidney Injury in vivo and in cell culture models
  • Potential role of microRNA transfer in the kidney in mediating the protective effects of exosome treatment

About Kevin D. Burns MD, CM, FRCP(C):

Dr. Burns is a professor of medicine in the division of Nephrology at the Department of Medicine of the Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa. He is senior scientist and director of the Kidney Research Centre of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and is cross-appointed to the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Dr. Burns’ research has focused on the function and regulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system in diabetic nephropathy and hypertension and the pathogenesis and treatment of acute kidney injury.

He received his BSc and MD degrees from McGill University and completed internal medicine residency and clinical nephrology fellowship training at the University of Ottawa. Dr. Burns also undertook basic science research training at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. His laboratory has been supported by funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Kidney Foundation of Canada, and the Canada Foundation for Innovation/Ontario Innovation Trust.

Dr. Burns is past president of the Canadian Society of Nephrology and is chair of the steering committee for the KRESCENT Program, a national kidney research training program launched by the Canadian Society of Nephrology, the Kidney Foundation of Canada, and the Canada foundation for Innovation/Ontario Innovation Trust. In 2010, Dr. Burns received the Medal for Research Excellence from the Kidney Foundation of Canada in recognition of his contributions to kidney research in Canada. To learn more about the KRESCENT program, please click here. 

______________________

We wish to thank Dr. Kevin Burns for sharing his
valuable insight on cord blood and kidney research
with our Share the Science community.
We also wish to thank Mediware, Inc.
for their generous support making this webinar possible. 

Share the Science continues to be a popular series within the cord blood community and beyond. We welcome your input on the series and suggestions for future speakers. Give your feedback here.

powerhouses of science - cord blood research
Previous Share the Science presentations have been archived for your reference. Discover the work of leading scientists and cord blood industry experts through this educational series. View the archive now.

Share the Science is made possible thanks to the generous support of Mediware, Inc.

 

Share the Science: Dr. Omar Aljitawi, Strategies to Improve Cord Blood Transplant Outcomes

Share the Science: Dr. Omar Aljitawi, Strategies to Improve Cord Blood Transplant Outcomes

Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. are proud to announce the next edition in our Share the Science series. On July 19th, 2017, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. welcomed Dr. Omar Aljitawi, MBBS to speak about his research on our popular “Share the Science” series. Dr. Aljitawi presented “Promising Strategies to Improve Umbilical Cord Blood Transplants.” Register now to view the recording of this free webinar.

As an associate professor of hematology/oncology for the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York, Dr. Aljitawi will discuss discuss the status of the field of umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant, including advantages, current indications, and major challenges. In particular, Dr. Aljitawi will discuss the newly discovered role of erythropoietin in cord blood stem cell function during transplant. He will address currently investigated approaches to target erythropoietin as a way to improve cord blood transplant outcomes.

Dr. Aljitawi specializes in studying human hematopoietic stem cells and their interaction with their microenvironment. In recent years, Dr. Aljitawi and his team have been investigating EPO signaling through EPO receptor (EPOR) effects on UCB CD34+ cell homing and engraftment. They recently discovered that exposure to erythropoietin impairs UCB CD34+ cell homing to the bone marrow. Building on this discovery, he and his team investigated the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) as a modality to lower systemic EPO with the aim of improving UCB CD34+ cell homing and engraftment.

In this edition of Share the Science, participants will learn about:

  • Advantages and limitations of umbilical cord blood transplant
  • Major challenges in the field of umbilical cord blood transplant
  • Currently investigated approaches to overcome umbilical cord blood transplant limitations
  • Role of erythropoietin in umbilical cord blood transplant

Join us for this special presentation. . . .

Dr. Omar Aljitawi, MBBS
from the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York

“Promising Strategies to Improve Umbilical Cord Blood Transplants”

Wednesday, 19 July 2017 at 1:30PM – 2:30PM Central Time
Free to register.  Open to the public.
RECORDING NOW AVAILABLE

REGISTER here to view the RECORDING of SHARE THE SCIENCE: Dr. Omar ALJITAWI – Promising Strategies to Improve Umbilical Cord Blood Transplants Outcomes

 

——————–

We wish to than Dr. Aljitawi for sharing his insight with our community
at Save the Cord Foundation. We also wish to thank the team at Mediware, Inc.
for their continued support in making this program possible. 

 

 

Want to learn more?

Share the Science continues to be a popular series within the cord blood community and beyond. We welcome your input on the series and suggestions for future speakers. Give your feedback here.

powerhouses of science - cord blood research
Previous Share the Science presentations have been archived for your reference. Discover the work of leading scientists and cord blood industry experts through this educational series. View the archive now.

Share the Science is made possible thanks to the generous support of Mediware, Inc.

 

Share the Science: Dr. Tim Nelson from the MAYO Clinic, Strengthening the HLHS Heart with Cord Blood

Share the Science: Dr. Tim Nelson from the MAYO Clinic, Strengthening the HLHS Heart with Cord Blood

Cutting edge research at the MAYO Clinic is leading to new hope for individuals with HLHS Heart Syndrome and cord blood is a critical part of the story. Can cord blood strengthen the heart?  Dr. Timothy Nelson recently discussed his latest clinical trial on “Share the Science.”

Update: Dr. Nelson made his presentation live on “Share the Science” on May 17th, 2017. The recording is now available for viewing. Please click below.

Free Webinar: Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware, Inc. are proud to welcome Dr. Timothy Nelson for our next edition of Share the Science on May 17th, 2017. Share the Science is a free webinar series focused on the cord blood industry and the latest research in this field.  As always, we invite both health professionals and the general public to join us for this enlightening presentation.

Imagine the news. . . you are pregnant or perhaps just gave birth and your doctor tells you that your baby’s heart has not developed correctly. It is HLHS. Treatment typically involves a series of three intense surgeries as soon as the baby is born. If left untreated, HLHS is fatal soon after birth.

What is HLHS?

HLHS or Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome is a rare and complex congenital heart defect for which there is currently no cure.  Affecting more than 2,000 newborns in the United States each year, this disease is defined by underdevelopment.  According to the Mayo Clinic, “In HLHS, the left side of a child’s heart — the left ventricle, ascending aorta and left heart valves — is severely underdeveloped. The result is a heart with only a single functional ventricular chamber — the right ventricle — and a small ascending aorta.” (Source: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER))

At the MAYO Clinic, Dr. Timothy Nelson, M.D., Ph.D. leads an innovative team of physicians and scientists with one goal in mind. . . find a cure for HLHS.  As the director of Mayo Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, and the the medical director of the Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, Dr. Nelson and his team are pursuing an innovative clinical trial using stem cells from cord blood to strengthen a baby’s heart following a HLHS diagnosis. The umbilical cord blood cells are processed in a specific manner in order to create highly concentrated stem cells that are injected into the heart at the time of the baby’s second open heart surgery.

The HLHS program has also recently created the HLHS consortium, a network of institutions that are participating in HLHS research. The consortium makes it easier for patients to participate in the overall research, including the umbilical cord blood collection, no matter their location.

Join us for this special presentation. . .

Dr. Timothy NELSON
from the Mayo Clinic’s
Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

“Strengthening the HLHS Heart Using Umbilical Cord Blood”

Wednesday, May 17 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Central Time

Free to register. Open to the public.

View the recording of SHARE THE SCIENCE with Dr. Timothy Nelson – Strengthening the HLHS Heart Using Umbilical Cord Blood

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • The importance of banking umbilical cord blood for babies with HLHS
  • What makes Mayo Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS unique when it comes to umbilical cord blood banking
  • Details about the clinical trial using umbilical cord blood for babies with HLHS
  • How HLHS research at Mayo Clinic’s HLHS program is changing the future for HLHS individuals

 

Want to learn more?

Share the Science continues to be a popular series within the cord blood community and beyond. We welcome your input on the series and suggestions for future speakers. Give your feedback here.

powerhouses of science - cord blood research
Previous Share the Science presentations have been archived for your reference. Discover the work of leading scientists and cord blood industry experts through this educational series. View the archive now.

Share the Science is made possible thanks to the generous support of Mediware, Inc.

 

About Save the Cord Foundation

Save the Cord Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization, was established to promote awareness of the life-saving benefits of cord blood based on unbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and family cord blood banks worldwide.

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