Women’s Health: Perinatal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine, presented by Dr. Cetrulo Sr.

Women’s Health: Perinatal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine, presented by Dr. Cetrulo Sr.

Recently on Share the Science. . . a special focus on Women’s Health and the revolutionary impact of perinatal stem cells in medicine!  Could we soon be treating victims of a stroke or heart attack with a “cord blood cocktail” in the emergency room? Don’t miss this discussion with Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr. and learn the latest.

Recently, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware were honored to host Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr. for a special edition of #SHARETHESCIENCE focused on Maternal Health (click the link below to watch the full recorded webinar).  Dr. Cetrulo Sr. is a board-certified in OB/GYN and maternal medicine, and former professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is also one of the leading pioneers of the cord blood movement as one of the two founding members of the International Cord Blood Society (ICBS), a non-profit organization founded in 1995 to promote cord blood research, and the nonprofit International Perinatal Stem Cell Society, Inc., formed in 2013.

For this edition of Share the Science, Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. discusses the importance of perinatal stem cells and the impact they will have on treating a variety of diseases. He discusses this revolution in Women’s Health / Maternal Health highlighting recent discoveries in the field and explaining the potential impact these discoveries will have on medicine in general.

In particular, Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. will discuss how he anticipates that in the near future people who go to emergency rooms with chest pain, with the presumptive diagnosis of a heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), will be given an off-the-shelf stem cell preparation to prevent heart muscle damage.

Here a quick preview of what to expect in this webinar:

FDA Policies Cord Blood Cellular Therapies

Watch the webinar now and learn:

  • The sources of perinatal stem cells
  • How early in pregnancy these cells are present
  • The potential of perinatal stem cells for the treatment of many diseases
  • The importance of saving the placenta, cord blood and cord tissue cells

Curtis L. Cetrulo Sr., M.D., discusses the importance of perinatal stem cells and the impact they will have on treating a variety of diseases.

Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr. presents
Women’s Health: “Perinatal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine”

RECORDED:  Wednesday, May 11th, 2016  11 a.m. – Noon U.S. Central Time

REGISTER NOW: Dr. Curtis Cetrulo Sr – “Perinatal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine”

Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. is widely recognized for his expertise in this field and never fails to impress when explaining the science behind some of the most advanced stem cell research happening today. His interest in perinatal stem cells has also had great impact on his career.

From 1984 until 2008, Dr. Cetrulo was a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is one of the two founding members of the International Cord Blood Society (ICBS), a non-profit organization founded in 1995 to promote cord blood research, and the nonprofit International Perinatal Stem Cell Society, Inc., formed in 2013.

Dr. Cetrulo is currently a board member and medical consultant for Auxocell Laboratories, Inc. He completed his obstetrics/gynecology residency program at the University of Colorado in Denver in 1973. After doing his undergraduate work at Columbia University (1965), Dr. Cetrulo graduated from the New Jersey College of Medicine in 1969.

A visionary in the field of women’s health, Dr. Cetrulo’s passion for the topic of perinatal stem cells is contagious. You will not want to miss this webinar.

 

Cord blood partners save the cord and mediwareWe wish to thank Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. for his time and Mediware for their continued support in bringing you the Share the Science series to you. 

 


Are you familiar with the REGROW act that Dr. Cetrulo Sr. refers to in his webinar? 

After you listen to Share the Science with Dr. Cetrulo Sr., please take a moment to show your support for the REGROW Act. The bipartisan Regrow Act has been introduced in the Senate to create a new regulatory pathway to bring safe and effective treatments to patients in the United States. While this petition is really US based, it has worldwide implications as other countries and their governments will be watching to see how the US welcomes this new era in medicine. Read more and sign the petition here. . . REGROW Act 

 


Are you enjoying our Share the Science series? 

Give a $10 Donation!

Thank you for joining us each time for a new and exciting discussion with a leading cord blood expert. We never charge a fee for our programs and we want to keep it that way.

At Save the Cord Foundation, we are serious about cord blood education. Help us to keep programs like Share the Science going strong and keep the cord blood industry growing strong, together.

Make a financial donation today!

Thank you.

 


CLICK HERE TO VIEW OTHER WEBINARS FROM THE SHARE THE SCIENCE ARCHIVE

The Story of Diane Paradise: Cord Blood for Hodgkins Lymphoma (continued #WeCanICan series)

The Story of Diane Paradise: Cord Blood for Hodgkins Lymphoma (continued #WeCanICan series)

Cord Blood for Hodgkins Lymphoma: The Story of Diane Paradise (Part 2: #WeCanICan Series)

Part 2 in our on-going series “#WeCanICan: Beat Cancer with Cord Blood” (in association with World Cancer Day)

Continued from page one of “Hodgkins Lymphoma Game Over: Diane Paradise Beat the Odds”. . .
(Go back to page 1)

In 2012, she saw her doctors for a check-up and they told her the cancer was back for a 5th time. However, this time they were not recommending a bone marrow transplant because they did not think she would survive it. She was told there were no more options.

Diane would not accept this. She was determined to find a treatment. Why not pursue other avenues she thought? She had done it before with decent success. She had nothing to lose at this point.

Diane researched everywhere. One of her doctors recommended she speak with the specialists at Johns Hopkins University.

She made an appointment and the doctors initially suggested a half match bone marrow transplant. However, Johns Hopkins was also involved in a clinical trial that compared the side effects of half match transplants to that of cord blood transplants.

Diane was intrigued.

ABOUT THIS CLINICAL TRIAL AT JOHNS HOPKINS
Note: This clinical trial is still on-going.

Purpose: Hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) are one treatment option for people with leukemia or lymphoma. Family members, unrelated donors or banked umbilical cord blood units with similar tissue type can be used for HCT.

This study will compare the effectiveness of two new types of bone marrow transplants in people with leukemia or lymphoma: one that uses bone marrow donated from family members with only partially matched bone marrow; and, one that uses two partially matched cord blood units.

This clinical trial is still recruiting participants.

Study Start Date: June 2012

Estimated Study Completion Date: June 2019

Estimated Primary Completion Date: June 2018 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

(Source: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01597778?term=Ephraim+Fuchs&rank=4 )

She drilled her doctors with a hundred questions on the clinical trial. Her main doctor, Dr. Ephraim Fuchs, Professor of Oncology and Immunology, was extremely patient with her questions and appreciated having such a knowledgeable patient.

He even answered long emails in the middle of the night as Diane debated what to do.

Diane remembers. . .

“After much consideration and research, I decided to become part of the clinical trial. It was a random selection that determined I would get the cord blood transplant as opposed to a bone marrow transplant from a half-matched sibling.”

Diane was told she would receive the cord blood transplant on December 3rd, 2013.

The procedure would require 5 days of chemotherapy and a round of total body radiation to cleanse her body of her own stem cells. Then, she would receive a double cord blood transplant where doctors hoped the stem cells from each cord would compete against each other leaving the strongest and best to graft.

Transplant day arrived.

Diane was ready and did not know what to expect.  She was pleasantly surprised how simple the procedure was. A cord blood transplant is more like a blood transfusion than a typical organ transplant.
(Watch this video to see a cord blood transplant and the process involved.)

Still, time is of the essence as the cord blood is thawed and prepared by the lab then transported to the doctors who actually perform the transplant. The actual transplant itself only takes about 20-30 minutes.

Diane was kept under observation for two days.  Her family and friends helped with the recovery process which was more difficult than expected.

The effects of the chemo and radiation hit her about a week after the transplant and she began to suffer from severe dehydration, diarrhoea, infection, etc.

It was a bit of a rollercoaster as there was hope she was doing better one moment but she soon developed another issue. She would become concerned when her counts dropped.

However, on December 30th, 2013, doctors told her the good news.

The stem cells had completely grafted 100%, meaning that she was now essentially “cancer-free.” Diane was thrilled!

Ephraim Fuchs Johns Hopkins Hospital with Diane Paradise

Diane with Dr. Ephraim Fuchs of Johns Hopkins

She was ready to go home, day 59 post-transplant, when the physician assistant pulled her aside and said her latest routine test results suggested a different problem. She had fungal pneumonia.

This was a highly critical situation for someone in her state. They insisted that she remain at the hospital for treatment another 14 days. She did and luckily the fungal medication worked as expected. Finally, she could go home.

Diane began to feel stronger. Her weight increased. Her energy started to come back.

Finally, after 19 years of struggle and endless treatments, she was cancer-free. Her follow-up tests since the transplant have confirmed her good state of health.

Diane feels that she has finally turned the corner on cancer.

She describes receiving a cord blood transplant as getting a new lease on life. So invigorated by the results, she has even taken up new sports like river kayaking!

“With cord blood, you get a clean slate. All those lessons you learned about being healthy on this journey with cancer can now be applied to your clean slate,” says Diane.

Since her transplant, Diane has continued to rebuild her body using all of the knowledge that she has acquired throughout the years on maintaining a healthy lifestyle and reducing cancer risks.

She has also continued with her career in new and interesting ways, namely the 365 Day Lifestyle project. Drawing on her experience and natural rebellious attitude (which has taken her far), Diane is using the 365 Day Lifestyle project to help others get the support and resources they need in overcoming life’s most difficult challenges.

It goes without saying that we should all be grateful to people like Diane who have opted to participate in clinical trials for cord blood.

Even if cord blood transplants have become much more common, researchers still have a lot of unanswered questions. The clinical trial in which she participated not only benefitted her but will bring insight to researchers and doctors everywhere.

When you ask Diane about her final thoughts on the experience, she is very clear. . .

“My biggest piece of advice is to know the cancer you have and the treatment options available. Don’t be afraid to ask questions until you are completely satisfied with the answers. The more you know, the better advocate you can be for yourself.”

As you can imagine, Diane is also greatly saddened by the fact that the majority of hospitals treat cord blood as medical waste when it could potentially save lives.

She feels obligated to tell expectant moms everywhere how important it is to save cord blood which is one of the reasons she has shared her story with Save the Cord Foundation.

She is eternally grateful to the families who donated the cord blood units that ultimately helped her.

For National Cord Blood Awareness month, she made a video to honor the donor’s birthday of the cord blood that grafted and ultimately gave her a new life:

Diane meets people all of the time who find it hard to believe her story. Yet, here she is. Living proof that #WeCanICan: Beat Cancer with Cord Blood!

*We wish to thank Diane for her time and assistance with this article.
To learn more about Diane, click here.


WCD2016_WeCanICan_webLearn more about our on-going series “# WeCanICan : Beat Cancer with Cord Blood” and register to be a part of our Parents community. We are committed to cord blood education for parents and the medical community worldwide. Show your support by sharing this information with others, especially expectant parents.

Hodgkins Lymphoma Game Over: Diane Paradise Beat the Odds (Part 2: #WeCanICan Series)

Hodgkins Lymphoma Game Over: Diane Paradise Beat the Odds (Part 2: #WeCanICan Series)

Hodgkins Lymphoma Game Over: Diane Paradise Chose Cord Blood Over Bone Marrow Transplant and Chemo (Part 2: #WeCanICan Series)

Deathly sick with Hodgkins Lymphoma and facing the 5th recurrence of the disease, Diane Paradise pushed doctors to help her. Educated about her options and her own body, she opted to participate in a clinical trial with cord blood instead of pursuing the usual bone marrow transplant and extended chemotherapy. This was a choice she does not regret. Diane is living proof that #WeCanICan: Beat Cancer with Cord Blood.

Part 2 in our on-going series “#WeCanICan: Beat Cancer with Cord Blood” (in association with World Cancer Day)

#WeCanICan: #BeatCancer with Cord Blood

Hodgkins Lymphoma Survivor Diane Paradise

Diane Paradise

At Save the Cord Foundation, we consider it an honor to meet cancer survivors like Diane Paradise. Each time we hear of someone’s personal fight against this terrible disease we get emotional. This is as human as it gets. A patient desperate for a solution only to be told that there is no cure. A doctor trying their best to help with the means they have. Everyone crossing their fingers that this time it is going to work.

Diane Paradise has been down this road too many times. She remembers her initial shock in 1994 when she was initially diagnosed with Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin disease. She was 24 and her life was about to change forever.

It all started with a lump under her arm. The doctor tested it and the results said it was benign. Five months later as second lump had formed. This time, the diagnosis was clear. It was December 1994 and doctors started her on 6 months of chemotherapy followed by 6 weeks of radiation.  She suffered the side effects. . .nausea, vomiting, days and days of soreness associated with chemotherapy. In addition, the radiation treatment left her with 3rd degree burns.

WHAT TYPE OF HODGKIN LYMPHOMA DID DIANE HAVE?
About Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin disease (NLPHD):
-Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin disease (NLPHD) is a rare form of Hodgkins Lymphoma which typically accounts for only 5% of Hodgkins Disease cases.
-Doctors sometimes refer to these particular cancer cells as “popcorn cells” because of their unique shape similar to popcorn. NLPHD can occur at any age.
-Typically, this form of Hodgkins Lymphoma occurs more frequently in men than women.
(Source: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/hodgkindisease/detailedguide/hodgkin-disease-what-is-hodgkin-disease)

Diane never stopped working during this time.  She was determined to not slow down and it seemed the treatments were a success.  She went into remission for 6 years.

Then, in 2001, during an annual check-up, her doctors gave her bad news. The cancer was back and this time the doctors said it was worse.  They told her it was incurable. She was advised that they could try a bone marrow transplant but that she would also need 10 months of chemotherapy.

Diane underwent numerous cancer treatments.

Fighting Hodgkins Lymphoma, Diane underwent numerous cancer treatments over the years.

Diane refused to give up. She had learned a lot about Hodgkins Lymphoma by this point. She also knew how her body reacted to the chemo and radiation.  She was leery of how well she could handle the chemotherapy.  She sought out alternatives to the recommended bone marrow transplant and chemotherapy. Her search led her to Arizona where she entered a clinic to undergo a naturopathic treatment protocol.

This alternative treatment was successful at keeping the cancer at bay for several years. However, in 2005, she regrettably found herself sick again. She promptly underwent Rituxin therapy and appeared to be getting better.

Time passed and Diane began to rebuild her life. Yet, in 2008, the cancer raised its ugly head again for a 4th time.  With the guidance of her conventional oncologist, Diane continued with her alternative treatment of diet, supplements and high dose vitamin C for two years under the watchful eye of her oncologist.  She was a model patient and again she managed to keep it under control during this watch and wait period.

Suddenly it shifted and during round 4, she learned it had metastasized into her bone marrow. She was wheelchair bound and underwent another round of chemotherapy and Rituxin until early 2011. She went into remission again according to her oncologist. Relieved, she started to return to life “as normal” and moved back to the East coast to be with her husband who had been transferred earlier that year.

In 2012, she saw her doctors for a check-up and they told her the cancer was back for a 5th time.  She immediately began a regimen of Rituxin again combined with Bendamustine. When these treatments showed no signs working effectively, the doctor informed her that there were no other options. She did not recommend a bone marrow transplant because she did not think Diane would survive it.

Frustrated, Diane decided it was time to find a new doctor. One who wasn’t quite as willing to give up. She started with a local cancer center where they were not only willing to continue treating her, but also recommended she search out some larger cancer hospitals who specialized in research. Her doctor at the cancer center wanted her to explore all possible options. . . . Click here to continue reading.


WCD2016_WeCanICan_webIn addition the materials provided by Save the Cord Foundation, we invite you to discover the numerous tools and fact sheets on cancer awareness, prevention and treatment provided in association with World Cancer Day.

Click here to find out how you can help build awareness of innovative treatments using cord blood.

 


nathan mumford cancer survivor cord blood for leukemiaRead part one in our #WeCanICan: Beat Cancer with Cord Blood series where we introduce to 3-time cancer survivor, Nathan Mumford (better known as “3-Peat”).  Like Diane, Nathan defied the odds thanks to cord blood.

GUEST POST: Hawaii Sees High Percentage of Multi-Ethnic Cord Blood Donors (part 2)

GUEST POST: Hawaii Sees High Percentage of Multi-Ethnic Cord Blood Donors (part 2)

Continued from part one: Guest post written by Dr. Randal Wada, Linda Watanabe and the wonderful team at Hawaii Cord Blood Bank
Dr. Randal Wada and the team at Hawaii Cord Blood Bank

Proud team at Hawai‘i Cord Blood Bank (left to right), should be: Dr. Randal Wada, President and Medical Director, Charis Ober from Save the Cord Foundation, Linda Watanabe, Administrative Manager, Lynette Matsumoto, Program Coordinator, Allison Sears, Donor Coordinator, Lisa Wong-Yamamoto, Nurse Educator.

Although founded to serve the people of Hawaii to fill the critical need for cord blood from multi-ethnic donors, HCBB has also proven to be a valuable resource for patients of Asian, Polynesian, or mixed ethnicity worldwide.

The Hawaii Cord Blood Bank is addressing an important need through its umbilical cord blood banking efforts, which help to increase access to transplant for minority patients in Hawaii and throughout the world.

Thanks to the hard work and devotion of hundreds of doctors and nurses who volunteer their time on our behalf, we offer cord blood donations at all five birthing hospitals on Oahu at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children, The Queens Medical Center, Tripler Army Medical Center, and Castle Medical Center as well as on Maui at the Maui Memorial Medical Center.

Mixed Race Cord Blood Donors - HCBB

Donor Maribeth Toledo‐ Cabuslay with Baby Ryan and Nurse Educator Lisa Wong‐Yamamoto, RNC as they wait to be interviewed by Hawai’i News Now newscasters

Our cord blood units are sent to our partners at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle for processing and storage. Cord blood units collected by the Hawaii Cord Blood Bank are listed with the National Marrow Donor Program’s network of cord blood banks.

HCBB is a small organization, yet we have collected over 10,000 units and stored over 3,000 cord blood units of which approximately 87% of our cord blood units collected are from minority or multi-ethnic donors.

Hawaii’s unique racial demographics make Hawaii Cord Blood Bank a national model for a system of cord blood collection and banking that is truly capable of reflecting the full spectrum of ethnic diversity within the population it seeks to serve.

 

Hawai'i Cord Blood Blank, Sharing the Gift of Life

 

We wish to thank the team at Hawaii Cord Blood Bank for this wonderful guest post and for the noble work they do everyday collecting cord blood and helping patients worldwide who are desperately waiting for a stem cell donor. You can learn more about the Hawaii Cord Blood Bank here.

Go back to part one of this article.

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GUEST POST:  Hawaii Cord Blood Bank – Sharing the Gift of Life

GUEST POST: Hawaii Cord Blood Bank – Sharing the Gift of Life

Guest post written by Dr. Randal Wada, Linda Watanabe and the wonderful team at Hawaii Cord Blood Bank

Hawai'i Cord Blood Blank, Sharing the Gift of Life

The Hawaii Cord Blood Bank (HCBB) is an independent, non-profit community service organization which began operations in 1998 as a means to help the challenge of finding donors for Hawaii’s ethnically diverse patient population.

A growing proportion of Hawaii’s population is comprised of people from multiple race/mixed ethnicity backgrounds.

According to the 2010 census, there has been a 32% increase in the multiple race segment of our population over the last decade, and Hawaii leads this national trend with 23% of the State’s population reporting two or more races.

This becomes a challenge when patients from Hawaii are searching for a matching bone marrow or stem cell donor since the majority of donors in our national registry are Caucasian, while donors from minorities (African American, Asian, Pacific Islanders) are underrepresented.

Mixed race patients may have inherited a tissue type that is common in one of their parent’s ethnic group, and another tissue type that is common in the other parent’s ethnic group. The combination of these two common types is often uncommon.

The diversity of Hawaii’s population is the main reason Hawaii patients needing stem cell transplants have an especially difficult time finding matching donors.

Although founded to serve the people of Hawaii to fill the critical need for cord blood from multi-ethnic donors, HCBB (click to continue reading). . .

Go to part two of this article.


ARE YOU JUST STARTING TO LEARN ABOUT CORD BLOOD?

Get involved. Join the cord blood movement.

Get involved. Register for our newsletter, make a donation. Make a difference.

You must have tons of questions. Perhaps, you have become confused by something you read in the media? You are not the only one.

Take a minute to read through some of the most frequently asked questions.

Then, step over to our section on the latest research and learn how quickly cord blood is changing medicine.

We interview doctors and researchers constantly. Discover the latest in cord blood derived stem cell therapies and learn how they might help you or someone in your family.

Repairing Organs and Treating Neonatal Diseases with Stem Cell Therapy, presented by Dr. Bernard THEBAUD

Repairing Organs and Treating Neonatal Diseases with Stem Cell Therapy, presented by Dr. Bernard THEBAUD

Recently on Share the Science, Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware were honored to host Dr. Bernard THEBAUD, neonatologist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and a senior scientist with the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute.  Dr. THEBAUD discussed using stem cell therapy to improve lung disease and repair organ damage in premature infants.

Dr. THEBAUDS’s research focuses on the clinical translation of stem-cell-based therapies for neonatal disease. Perinatal care has improved tremendously over recent generations.  Thus, the survival rate of premature children has likewise increased.  However, with this improvement in survival rates come new challenges.  Dr. THEBAUD sees this first hand in his work.

A premature infant faces numerous challenges in terms of organ development. One of the biggest challenges is protecting premature lungs from injury.

Premature infants are at risk of developing chronic lung disease or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The long-term consequences of early interference with lung development are not completely understood and there are no specific treatments to prevent complications of extreme prematurity.

Dr. THEBAUD and his team are on the cutting edge of stem cell biology and using stem cells to repair damaged organs.  In recent years, investigators have captured the repair capabilities of a variety of stem cells in experimental models of BPD. While it is clear that further pre-clinical studies are needed, this webinar with Dr. THEBAUD will highlight the exciting potential for umbilical cord blood derived stem cell based therapies for the prevention or treatment of BPD and other complications.

Dr. THEBAUD’s sucesses in this area of research are leading to promising results with patients; yet, challenges still remain. He will discuss this and more during our next Share the Science:

Dr. Bernard THEBAUD presents
“Recycling Matters: Cord-Derived Stem Cell Treatment of Neonatal Diseases”

RECORDED:  Thursday, April 28th, 11 a.m. – Noon U.S. Central Time

WATCH THE WEBINAR NOW: Dr. Bernard THEBAUD, Recycling Matters – Cord-Derived Stem Cell Treatment of Neonatal Diseases

Specialist in stem cell therapies for lung diseases, Dr. Thébaud is a senior scientist with the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and a neonatologist with the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, where he provides care to critically ill newborns.  He is also a professor of Pediatrics at the University of Ottawa.

Dr. Thébaud obtained his medical degree at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg, France in 1991 and trained in pediatrics and neonatology at the University Paris V in Paris, France, where he also obtained his M.Sc. and Ph.D. before completing a 2-year post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Alberta.

He received the “Rising Star in Perinatal Research” award from the CIHR Institute for Human Development, Child and Youth Health in 2008, and the “Best in Current Canadian Child Health Research” Sanofi Pasteur Research Award in 2007. Dr. Thébaud currently holds the University of Ottawa Partnership Research Chair in Regenerative Medicine.

 

Cord blood partners save the cord and mediwareWe wish to thank Dr. THEBAUD for his time and Mediware for their continued support in bringing you the Share the Science series to you. 


Are you enjoying our Share the Science series? 

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Thank you for joining us each time for a new and exciting discussion with a leading cord blood expert. We never charge a fee for our programs and we want to keep it that way.

At Save the Cord Foundation, we are serious about cord blood education. Help us to keep programs like Share the Science going strong and keep the cord blood industry growing strong, together.

Make a financial donation today!

Thank you.

About Save the Cord Foundation

Save the Cord Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization, was established to promote awareness of the life-saving benefits of cord blood based on unbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and family cord blood banks worldwide.

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