Rare, Two-Time Bone Marrow Donor: Sean Patterson (part three)

Rare, Two-Time Bone Marrow Donor: Sean Patterson (part three)

Part Three: Interview with two-time bone marrow donor, Sean Patterson

STCF:  How did you feel on the big day? What was it like to donate bone marrow? 

Sean Patterson discussing bone marrow donation and giving with elementary students.

Discussing his bone marrow donor story and “Blessing Bags” distributed by the 411 Foundation with third graders.

July 18, 2014…DONATION DAY!!!! Nothing could prepare me for the range of emotions that hit me on this day. My thoughts and prayers were and had always been with this little girl and her family and today was the day that they were going to have the CHANCE to win the fight. The donation process wasn’t nearly as bad as I thought it was going to be, but I could definitely tell that I had been stuck in the back a few times….OUCH!!! While the procedures varies slightly from hospital to hospital, generally, the doctors make several (typically one to four) small incisions through the skin over the back of the pelvic bones. The incisions are less than one-fourth inch long and do not require stitches. The doctors inserts a special hollow needle through these incisions over the rear of the pelvic bone with a syringe attached to the needle to draw out the marrow.

STCF:  Sean, your donor story is rare because you donated twice. Why?

Things didn’t go as planned with the little girl and the bone marrow and I was asked in early September 2014 if I would be willing to donate stem cells to assist the bone marrow process and what do you think my answer was to that…yup you guessed it I said YES!!! The stem cell donation was scheduled for October 20, 2014, but before I was able to donate I had to do five days of Filgrastim injections. These injections had my body sore and this felt worse that any part of the bone marrow donation, but I wouldn’t change anything about the process to give this little girl a chance.

October 20, 2014…STEM CELL DONATION DAY. This donation was done through a process called apheresis, which is similar to donating plasma. During apheresis, a needle is placed into each of your arms. Blood is removed from a vein in one arm and passed through tubing into a blood cell separator machine. The machine collects blood-forming cells, platelets, and some white blood cells. Plasma and red blood cells are returned to your body through the other arm. All the tubing used in the machine is sterile and is used only once for your donation. Seventy-five percent of all PBSC donations are completed in one apheresis session, which may last up to eight hours. The remaining 25 percent of donations are completed in two apheresis sessions, which will take four to six hours each day. My donation was completed in three hours.

The last update I received in December of 2014 was the little girl’s body hadn’t fully accepted my bone marrow or stem cells, but I was hopeful that it would. At first I took this personally and felt like a failure until friends and family pointed out that I had done my part and I had given this little girl A CHANCE!!

Sadly, I received a call on April 3, 2015 that the little girl had passed away. I didn’t feel like I had done enough to help her, but everyone let me know that I had given the family more time with her.

STCF:  Sean, we agree with your friends and family that you did the most that anyone could do to help this little girl.  Indeed, you have gone well beyond the call of duty by encouraging others to donate as well. Your compassion has led you to do wonderful things via your foundation. Tell us about the foundation and the work you do. 

411Foundation_Sean PattersonOn April 26, 2014, the 411 Foundation held a donor registration drive and was able to get forty new donors registered. These forty new donors give more individuals and families the CHANCE of winning their fight with blood cancer.

 

 

 

 

STCF:  Sean, you agree with us that both bone marrow donation and cord blood donation are important. The collection processes for each could not be more different. Cord blood can only be collected at birth. . . a fleeting, precious moment. What is your advice to expectant parents? 

My advice to parents is to really consider donating cord blood. By donating, parents could save a life. This process doesn’t hurt anyone, but it could help someone and that’s all that matters.

STCF:  Thank you, Sean, for spending time with us today. Your compassion is certainly contagious!!

Give life twice. #SAVETHECORD

Go back to part two: Sean Patterson


You can make a difference.

Donate your baby’s cord blood and/or become a bone marrow donor yourself.

Read more about Sean’s story here.

 BETHEMATCH Sean Patterson


Pregnant? Want to donate cord blood?

We can help. Find a hospital with public donation program or contact a hybrid bank to help you.

Cord blood banking saves lives.

Sean Patterson: Bone Marrow Donor Story (part two)

Sean Patterson: Bone Marrow Donor Story (part two)

Part Two:  Interview with Sean Patterson: Bone Marrow Donor Story

Sean Patterson Bone Marrow Donor Story

Sean Patterson with his son, Isaac

STCF:  How did you find out that you were a match for someone? What was the process?

I was not a match and neither were my fellow co-workers for a possible donation to our co-worker and she passed away in January of 2013. At the time I didn’t really understand the process so I thought this was the end of my donor experience until I received an email from Be The Match on March 12, 2014 that read “You may be a possible match for an eight year old girl so please call us if you are still interested in being a donor”. I made the call immediately and went through the questionnaire to see if I would be moving on to blood testing. At the end this phone conversation an appointment to draw blood was scheduled for the next day March 13, 2014. I got an email letting me know that I would be notified in 60 days on whether or not I was a match for the little girl.

April 7, 2014 I got a call from Be The Match and I heard the sweetest words ever…”You are the best possible match for the girl. Do you still want to donate bone marrow?” My answer was a quick and definitive…YES!!! This call came three days after my son’s seventh birthday and from the time I got the first email in March I always thought about what if this was my son in this situation, I would hope that someone would be eager enough to help him.

STCF:  Some people are nervous about donating bone marrow once they learn that they are a match for someone in need. What is your advice to them?  

My focus was giving this little girl a chance and no matter how much people said it was going to hurt it didn’t bother me because I knew that my discomfort from the bone marrow donation would be gone in a few days compared to what this little girl was going through day after day for who knows how long.

There were many emails, test, phone calls, long days and plenty of people from Be The Match asking me “Are you sure that you want to do this” and my answer was ALWAYS the same…..YES!!! I asked the Be The Match to please note on my record that I’m not going to change my mind so they don’t need to ask me if I’m sure because I’ve never been so sure!!

STCF:  Unfortunately, many patients suffering from blood cancers like leukemia, lymphoma and sickle cell anemia never find a bone marrow donor match. Many of these patients are of African American origin. They face additional challenges in finding a match via the National Bone Marrow Registry because there are significantly fewer African American donors.  In these cases, doctors often turn to cord blood as a possible source of stem cells. Increasingly, we are seeing amazing results from these cord blood transplants, especially when treating blood cancers.  

Why do you think the national registry of bone marrow donors lacks donors of African American origin? How could this be improved?  What are your feelings on cord blood donation and how can we encourage African American / Mixed Race parents to donate their child’s cord blood?

I think that a lot of African Americans don’t donate because they have heard that it is painful or that there are side effects so this keeps people from even being tested. Some of the other reasons may be religious reasons or not trusting that the bone marrow or cord blood will be allocated evenly.

 

Go back to part one: Sean Patterson

Go forward to part three: Sean Patterson


Are you surprised to hear how difficult it is for African Americans to find a stem cell donor?

Ethnic minorities are terribly underrepresented in the national bone marrow registry.  We see a similar trend in the national cord blood registry as well. Currently, it is estimated that “for African Americans and other minorities, the chances of finding a match can be as low as 66%, versus 93% for Caucasians.” (source: BeTheMatch).

To understand how a bone marrow or cord blood donation can save someone’s life.  . . read about Judge Fox, a North Carolina Judge who fought the odds and won — thanks to cord blood.

Judge Fox Receives Cord Blood Transplant

Donor Story: Sean Patterson Sets a New Standard in Giving

Donor Story: Sean Patterson Sets a New Standard in Giving

It is not everyday that you meet an angel but we think we may have found one in Sean Patterson.  His donor story is unusual because he actually donated bone marrow stem cells not once, but twice!

Sean’s donor story is one of giving. He stands as an example to us all of how easy (and necessary) it is to help each other, help a stranger and become someone greater by donating bone marrow and/or cord blood stem cells. Indeed, Sean has become someone greater. By donating bone marrow twice, he has set a new standard in giving.

We met Sean through an event for Be The Match where he was being honored for his generosity and amazing compassion. As founder of the 411 Foundation, a non-profit focused on helping young adults, Sean’s sense of giving boils over into everything he does. We spoke with him about the importance of giving, the work he does at the 411 Foundation and why he sees bone marrow and cord blood donation as an obvious choice.

Warning: Sean Patterson’s sense of compassion and giving is contagious!

Sean Patterson and Mom

Two-time Donor: Sean Patterson with his mother

STCF: Sean, why did you donate bone marrow? How does your donor story begin?

John Bunyan said “You have not lived a day until you have done something for someone who can never repay you” and being a donor for Be The Match is exactly that opportunity to do something for someone who could never repay you. The reality is that we don’t sign up to be a donor so that someone can repay us, we sign up to be a donor because we want to give individuals and families the opportunity to make memories and enjoy life.

My Be The Match donor story starts on September 26, 2012 when my employer held a donor drive for a co-worker who was in need of a bone marrow transplant. Signing up to be a donor was an opportunity to possibly help save someone’s life so I jumped at the chance and many of my co-workers did the same with the hopes that a match could help save a life. The process was easy …a simple cheek swab and some paper work. The hardest part was waiting to find out if I was match or not.

Go forward to part two: Sean Patterson


Did you know that cord blood is often the best option for patients suffering from blood cancers like leukemia, lymphoma and sickle cell anemia?  Meet Nathan or Dylan and see how cord blood can save lives, not tomorrow but today.

nathan mumford cancer survivor cord blood for leukemia

cord blood transplant recipient leukemia

Cord blood is currently used to treat over 80 different diseases and, in most of these cases, the cord blood is donated by a stranger. Cord blood donation is not available everywhere but Save the Cord Foundation is working to change that.

Learn about wonderful public cord blood donation programs like:

Arizona Public Cord Blood Program

Jeevan Public Cord Blood Program in India

Hybrid banks that support public cord blood donation nationwide

Support the work we are doing at Save the Cord Foundation. Donate today.

GUEST POST:  We are Having a Baby! A Father’s Advice on Cord Blood

GUEST POST: We are Having a Baby! A Father’s Advice on Cord Blood

When talking about cord blood, we must not forget the father’s opinion. He brings a unique perspective to the decision making process.  Save the Cord Foundation recently reached out to several fathers who, along with the rest of their family, agreed to save their baby’s cord blood. This is the first in a series of guest blog posts from fathers.

A longtime supporter of Save the Cord Foundation, Donald Hudspepth, father and General Manager at LifeForce Cryobanks, had some very good points to make on why dads everywhere should get more involved in supporting cord blood preservation. The following is his advice to future parents everywhere.

“We are having a baby!”  Along with “Yes, I’ll Marry you” and “I Do”, these are some of the most exciting (and scariest) words a guy can hear. Your mind races at breakneck speed to comprehend all the possibilities. But let me tell you, there is nothing better than holding your newborn and seeing that first smile! (They’ll tell you it’s just gas, but you’ll know the truth!) But now what? You’ve got another mouth to feed and someone to protect from this harsh, cruel world.

It’s never too early to start thinking about protecting or “taking care” of your children. Whether it’s starting a college fund or savings account, setting up simple life insurance, “baby-proofing” the house (there’s NO such thing!), or watching You-tube how-to videos, it’s never too early!

So, I would like to talk with you about something you and mom can do now, before the baby is born, to help protect and take care of your baby and family….umbilical cord blood banking. The blood remaining in the umbilical cord after the baby is born is rich in stem cells. These cells are the building blocks for the entire body, bones, muscles, blood, organs, everything. As such, they can be stored to be used at a later date to treat over 75 diseases.

Currently, cord blood stem cells are used as an alternative source to bone marrow to treat various leukemias, lymphomas, anemias, and enzyme deficiency diseases. Clinical trials are ongoing to look at using stem cells to treat most every major disease we can study. Things like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, stroke, cerebral palsy, diabetes, heart attack, spinal injury and the list goes on. These cells have a huge potential for treating tens of millions of people worldwide.

Now, is your one time to collect them. Save them from the medical waste trash and let them be the tiny miracles they were created to be. Private family banking is widely available and at a wide range of prices. Do your research and find a company that you are comfortable using. Call them and ask questions. Speak to your doctor about your family medical history to determine your future potential risks. Speak with each other to determine if you can financially add stem cell banking to your budget (many companies offer long term financing options). Knowledge is key.

But, I ask, from one parent to another, please, please, please consider your options. Private banking admittedly is not for everyone. But, you can also donate the cord blood to be used to help treat anyone in the world in need of a stem cell transplant. Either way, it doesn’t end up in the hospital trash can. You are about to begin the most significant part of your life as you raise and care for your newborn. As with everything else you will do, knowledge of your options, doing research to understand them, and discussions with your partner will guide you to a successful outcome.

Congratulations on your pregnancy! I wish you all the best of luck and a most happy and enjoyable life together surrounded by love!

~ Donald Hudspeth

Give life twice. #SAVETHECORD.


Learn more about family banking at LifeForce Cryobanks or discover how you can donate your baby’s cord blood via the popular “Cord for Life” program sponsored by LifeForce Cryobanks.

cord-for-life  LifeForce Cryobanks

Cellular Therapies for Athletes and Possible FDA Policies: Interview with Dr. Cetrulo, Sr.

Cellular Therapies for Athletes and Possible FDA Policies: Interview with Dr. Cetrulo, Sr.

How will future FDA policies affect research and potential cellular therapies using cord blood and other perinatal stem cells? Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. explains his concerns in this video.

Together with our friends at BioInformant, we recently spoke with Dr. Curtis Cetrulo, Sr. at the 2016 Perinatal Stem Cell Conference in Aspen, Colorado about cellular therapies and potential FDA policies.

This is not the first time that we have interviewed Dr. Cetrulo, Sr.. Each time we are impressed with his vision of how the cord blood and perinatal stem cell industry is developing. A pioneer in this field, he has always been an advocate for cord blood preservation and, as much as is possible, the preservation of all perinatal stem cells.

Curtis Cetrulo speaks on FDA Policies and cellular therapies

Dr. Curtis Cetrulo, Sr. speaking at the 2016 Perinatal Stem Cell Conference

Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. was one of the main speakers at this event where he presented:

“Perinatal Stem Cells and Reconstructive Transplantation: Potential Therapies for Wounded Warriors and Athletes”

The presentation focused on the increasingly interesting research involving the use of various types of perinatal stem cells (including those from cord blood) in the treatment of sports injuries.

We asked Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. to give us a quick overview of his presentation in simple terms so that our community of parents and medical professionals could hear for themselves what makes perinatal stem cells special and why we should save them.  Indeed, he discussed this and more during our quick chat. He also expressed his growing concern that future government policies, such as those coming up for debate with the FDA, might try to limit what we can do with stem cells in such a way that could impede research or rule out certain applications that are potentially very beneficial.

Watch this interview to learn about the potential of perinatal stem cells and hear Dr. Cetrulo’s concerns about potential FDA policies, a concern we share:

 

FDA Policies Cord Blood Cellular Therapies

 

We wish to thank Dr. Cetrulo, Sr. and the Perinatal Stem Cell Society for their help in making this project possible. 

cord tissue - bioinformant and save the cord foundation


 

This quick interview with Dr. Cetrulo Sr. is great introduction
to his more detailed presentation on
SHARE THE SCIENCE:
Women’s Health: Perinatal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

 


Are you looking for a public cord blood donation program or a family bank near you?
Simply explore our map or check out our list of cord blood banks and donation programs around the world.

cord-blood-world-map

Preview Changes to FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin

Preview Changes to FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin

Recently on Share the Science, Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin, Chief Medical Officer at FACT, gave a preview to the upcoming changes for FACT Accreditation Standards.

Preview FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr Phyllis Warkentin

Share the Science: Preview FACT Accreditation Standards with Dr Phyllis I. Warkentin

As the Chief Medical Officer for the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT), Dr. Phyllis I. Warkentin is at the forefront of the cord blood industry.  Her unique experience and perspective are valued not only by those who are members of FACT but the stem cell community at large.

Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware recently welcomed Dr. Warkentin as a featured speaker on our Share the Science webinar series.  She took the opportunity to openly discuss the upcoming 6th edition NetCord-FACT Standards which will be published in July 2016.

FACT is a unique organization and one of only two groups that officially accredit cord blood banks worldwide.  Established in 1996, it is a non-profit group focused on standards for high quality medical and laboratory practice in cellular therapies. The voluntary inspection program is at the core of the group’s purpose as it relies heavily on peer review and a collegial approach.

FACT standards are reviewed and updated every three years based on scientific advances, recommendations from cord blood banking experts, and common deficiencies. As a founding member of the FACT Board of Directors, Dr. Warkentin established the standards-setting and accrediting arm of FACT’s parent organizations: The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) and the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT).

During her presentation (view the recorded webinar now), Dr. Warkentin explained in detail why FACT chose to make these changes in accreditation standards and extended recommendations to cord blood banks globally on how to best meet the new standards.

Please join our professional community at Save the Cord Foundation where we keep you in the loop on the latest research, best practices and key events in cord blood industry.

*Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware wish to thank
Dr. Warkentin and FACT for helping to make this webinar possible.


Who’s speaking next?  Keep up with the latest in cord blood banking. Register for the next SHARE THE SCIENCE event here.

Discover some of our other articles that give an in-depth view of the cord blood banking, research and best practices:

Upcoming Event: Cord Blood Experts Meet in London for World Congress

Upcoming Event: Cord Blood Experts Meet in London for World Congress

Save the Cord Foundation is proud to announce that we will be presenting in London along with other cord blood experts at the upcoming Cord Blood World Europe Congress.

Cord blood experts agree. . . progress is happening at lightning speed in terms of cord blood research and current applications. Doctors around the world are learning how to use cord blood effectively to treat patients affected by one of more than 80 different diseases. Yet, as the industry grows and matures, there is a growing need for cord blood experts to agree on how we should reduce costs, increase inventories, improve quality and thus improve our chances for more transplants.

This spring we will be in London at the Cord Blood World Europe Congress presenting. . .

“What is the “Cord Blood Education Movement” and what could this mean for the industry?”

We will be talking not only about our own work in the area of cord blood education but how important social change is to the industry in general. We are on the cusp of a medical revolution as cord blood transplants are now becoming more common and recent research has confirmed the importance of cord blood stem cells (and perinatal stem cells in general) in the emerging field of regenerative medicine.

However, it is clear that progress will be stopped in its tracks if the industry does not invest in education at all levels with parents, medical professionals and even government officials.

At Save the Cord Foundation, we take cord blood education seriously and we have seen what a difference it can make when everyone is clear on the facts. . . honest about the current state of research. . . pro-active in asking parents to either donate or family bank their child’s cord blood. The challenges are not unique to one country, one region or one state. The challenges facing the industry cross political borders and demand the attention of both public and private sectors.

Education is key to social change and social change is key to the future of the industry.

We need to invest in cord blood education the same way we invest in research. It is not about providing commercial flyers. It is about providing truly educational programs. It is about providing support and guidance. It is about encouraging more questions. . . learning.Charis Ober, Director of Save the Cord Foundation

We simply can’t progress without education. It needs to be integral to everything we do.

Without education, . . who will carry this industry forward? 
How can we expect government leaders to make appropriate policies for the industry?
How do we expect cord blood inventories to increase whether public or private?

How do expect doctors to consider cord blood transplants for patients? 

It’s clear. We must invest in education just like we invest in research. They go hand in hand. Education is key to true and healthy social change.

We hope you can join us for this lively discussion on day 2 of the Cord Blood World Europe Congress in London where these issues and many others will be . . . debated, solved and pushed forward into new ideas. Progress is bound to happen at this event where cord blood experts like Gluckman, Kurtzberg, Wise Young and many others will be present.

Let’s learn from each other and take advantage of one of nature’s most wonderful gifts. . . cord blood.

Give life twice. #SAVETHECORD.

cord blood experts world congress

 

 

We wish to thank Cord Blood World Europe (visit site) and Free Digital Photos (visit site) for their contributions to this article.

cord blood world europe 2016 logo

Cord Blood Stem Cells for Brain & Spinal Cord Injury: Dr. Cox Discusses His Clinical Trial

Cord Blood Stem Cells for Brain & Spinal Cord Injury: Dr. Cox Discusses His Clinical Trial

Together with our friends at BioInformant, we recently spoke with Dr. Charles Cox, Jr. from the Texas Trauma Institute about his work and on-going clinical trial focused on using cellular therapies (including the use of cord blood stem cells) for traumatic brain injury, and related neurological injuries (hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, stroke, spinal cord injury). His team has recently completed Phase 1 of an important clinical trial in this area of research.

Dr. Cox is the George and Cynthia Mitchell Distinguished Chair in Neurosciences and directs the Pediatric Surgical Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine at the UTHealth Medical School. He also directs the Pediatric Trauma Program at the UT Health Medical School/Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital in the Texas Medical Center.

We caught up with Dr. Cox during the 2016 Perinatal Stem Cell Conference in Aspen, Colorado where he was one of the main speakers at this event and presented:

“Cell based therapies for neurological injuries: Update on clinical trials.”

For parents and doctors alike, the work of Dr. Cox and his team is incredibly important. He has just completed the first acute, autologous cell therapy treatment Phase I study for traumatic brain injury in children. It is a collaborative effort between leading institutions in the Texas Medical Center including The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Memorial Hermann Children’s Hospital, MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital, and The Center for Cell and Gene Therapy (CAGT) at Baylor College of Medicine. Pediatric patients (age 5-14) with a post-resuscitation Glascow Coma Score (GCS) between 5 and 8 are identified and further evaluated. The clinical trial is registered under FDA IND RB 12620.

This study began in 2006 with a focus on using bone marrow to treat traumatic brain injury. The study has evolved to include analysis of the use of cord blood stem cells in treating traumatic brain injury and the role of heterologous cellular therapies. Dr. Cox’s discussed the use of cord blood stem cells as it relates to this study in this short interview (watch the video of this interview):

Cord Blood Stem Cells for Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

Regenerative medicine is an amazing field of medicine which is quickly changing the way we treat not only traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury but hearing loss, stroke, etc. Cord blood stem cells are vital to this area of medicine. However, cord blood stem cells are typically thrown away as medical waste when a baby is born.

Scientists like Dr. Cox hope that more parents will realize the value of cord blood. It could make the difference in someone’s life. Traumatic brain injuries and spinal cord injuries are not something we can foresee. These injuries can happen in the blink of an eye.

Using cord blood stem cells in regenerative medicine to treat these types of injuries is potentially a game changer for patients around the world. Yet, it won’t happen if we continue to throw cord blood away. We must change our habits. We must be pro-active as parents and insist that our baby’s cord blood either be donated or privately banked at birth. This simple gesture does not harm you or your baby but it could change the world of medicine forever.

Give life twice. #SAVETHECORD

We wish to thank Dr. Cox and the Perinatal Stem Cell Society for their help in making this project possible. 

cord tissue - bioinformant and save the cord foundation


 

Are you pregnant?

Want to save your baby’s cord blood? Check out our interactive guide to cord blood banking where we list both private family banks and public donation programs around the world:

cord-blood-world-map

 

Cord Blood Webinar: Dr. Elmoazzen from Cord Blood Bank at Canadian Blood Services

Cord Blood Webinar: Dr. Elmoazzen from Cord Blood Bank at Canadian Blood Services

Save the Cord Foundation and Mediware recently welcomed Dr. Heidi Elmoazzen from the public cord blood bank at Canadian Blood Services for an informative cord blood webinar as part of our on-going Share the Science series.

cord blood webinar share the science canada

Featured Cord Blood Webinar Speaker: Dr. Heidi Elmoazzen, Project Director, Cord Blood Bank, Canadian Blood Services

Dr. Heidi Elmoazzen is the Project Director of the National Cord Blood Bank and Stem Cell Manufacturing at Canadian Blood Services.

During this insightful cord blood webinar, Dr. Elmoazzen discussed strategies for improving the quality of inventory in cord blood banks as well as strategies for increasing the utilization of banked cord blood units.

She spoke about some of the factors, including ethnic diversity, total nucleated cell (TNC) count, processing parameters, HLA typing (resolution and NIMA) as well as accreditation, that play an important role in the selection of cord blood units for transplant.

Dr. Emoazzen’s presentation also examined recent data regarding the Cord Blood Unit Utilization Score (Magalon et al., 2015) and how to apply it in a given cord blood inventory.

If you are a health professional or work in the cord blood industry, we highly recommend taking a little time today to watch the live recording of this cord blood webinar (available online here).

Likewise, please join our professional community at Save the Cord Foundation where we keep you in the loop on the latest research, best practices and key events in cord blood industry.


Who’s speaking next?  Register for the next SHARE THE SCIENCE event here.

Discover some of our other articles that give an in-depth view of the cord blood research and best practices:

Morey Kraus Discusses Cord Tissue Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine

Morey Kraus Discusses Cord Tissue Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine

Together with our friends at BioInformant, we recently spoke with Morey Kraus, Chief Scientific Officer at PerkinElmer/Viacord, about the importance of cord tissue stem cells in regenerative medicine.

We caught up with Mr. Kraus during the 2016 Perinatal Stem Cell Conference in Aspen, Colorado. Kraus was one of the main speakers at this event where he presented:

“Phenotypic and Functional Characterization Perinatal Stem Cells Isolated from Umbilical Cord Tissue”

The presentation was mainly for researchers and other experts in the cord blood or regenerative medicine field. However, the key point of this presentation is very relevant to parents who are considering whether or not to save their baby’s cord blood.  Kraus’ research underscores the important role of cord blood and umbilical cord tissue stem cells in regenerative medicine.

We asked Mr. Kraus to give us a quick overview of his presentation in simple terms so that parents everywhere could hear for themselves what makes these stem cells special and why we should save them. Watch this quick 2 minute interview and get the facts on cord tissue stem cells:

Video Cord Tissue Stem Cells with Morey Kraus

News Flash! It is not just a baby’s cord blood that has life-saving qualities. Scientists value perinatal stem cells in general and encourage parents to preserve as many of these cells as possible, including cord tissue.

If you are taking the first step in saving cord blood, consider also saving the other perinatal stem cells such as cord tissue. Not all family banks or donation programs offer this option currently but it is a growing trend because scientists are finding more and more uses for these valuable cells.
Give life twice. #SAVETHECORD

We wish to thank Morey Kraus and the Perinatal Stem Cell Society for their help in making this project possible. 

cord tissue - bioinformant and save the cord foundation


 

Are you looking for a public cord blood donation program or a family bank near you?
Simply explore our map or check out our list of cord blood banks and donation programs around the world.

cord-blood-world-map

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About Save the Cord Foundation

Save the Cord Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization, was established to promote awareness of the life-saving benefits of cord blood based on unbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and family cord blood banks worldwide.

Support Save the Cord Foundation

Our mission depends on supporters like you. Please support our cause by making a donation or promoting our website and message where you can. We appreciate all the support!
(We NEVER ask for cash donations. Online donations are easier and safer. Thank you.)

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